Boniface I…

…judges Francis’ idea on the pastor

  • Let us not be dumb dogs, sleeping sentinels, hirelings that fly from the wolf

Let us not be dumb dogs, sleeping sentinels, hirelings that fly at the sight of the wolf: but watchful and diligent pastors; preaching to the great and small, to the rich and poor, to every age and condition, being instant in season and out of season. (Saint Boniface. Letter to Cuthbert (Epistle 105): PL 89, 765-768)

…judges Francis’ idea on good-will replacing theological investigation

  • The Council did not dare establish anything above the office of the Pope

The institution of the universal Church that sprang forth took her origin from the dignified office of blessed Peter, in which her government and preeminence rest. In fact, from this source flowed the ecclesiastical discipline for all the Churches while the cultivation of religion was already growing. The decrees of the Council of Nicaea bear witness to nothing else: so much so that (the council) did not dare establish anything above (this office), since it saw that nothing could take place above its proper right, and, finally, it knew that everything had been granted to it by the word of the Lord. Therefore, it is certain that this (Roman Church) is, as it were, like the head of its members for the Churches spread throughout the whole world. (Denzinger-Hünermann 233. Boniface I, Letter Institutio to the Bishops of Thessalonica, March 11, 422)

…judges Francis’ idea on a horizontal Church

  • The care for the universal Church is the duty of the Apostle Peter

Through the pronouncement of the Lord, the responsibility received from him for the universal Church belongs to the blessed apostle Peter, who indeed knew, according to the testimony of the Gospel, that (this Church) was founded on him. Nor could his dignified office be without responsibilities, since it is certain that all matters depend on his deliberation… (Denzinger-Hünermann 234. Boniface I. Letter Manet beatum, to Rufus and the Other Bishops in Macedonia, March 11, 422 AD)

…judges Francis’ words in his first appearance

  • The watchful care over the universal Church is confided to Peter – His office can never be free from cares

The watchful care over the universal Church confided to Peter abides with him by reason of the Lord’s statement; for he knows on the testimony of the Gospel (Mt 16:18) that the Church was founded on him. His office can never be free from cares, since it is certain that all things depend on his deliberation. (Denzinger-Hünermann 234. Boniface I, Epistle Manet Beatum to Rufus and the other Bishops throughout Macedonia, March 11, 422)

…judges Francis’ ideas on the norms of the Church

  • Ecclesiastic discipline took origin from the office of St. Peter

The institution of the nascent universal Church took origin from the office of Blessed Peter, in which consists its direction and apex. In effect, from this source flowed, in accordance with the development of religion, the ecclesiastic discipline in all of the Churches. (Denzinger-Hünermann 233. Boniface I, Epistle Retro maioribus tuis, to Rufus, bishop of Thessaly, March 11, 422)

…judges Francis’ idea that the Pope should not judge

  • It is not licit to put up opposition to the apostolic supremacy

No one has ever boldly raised his hands in opposition to the apostolic supremacy, from whose judgment there may be no withdrawal; no one in this has been rebellious, except him who wished judgment to be passed on himself. (Denzinger- Hünermann 235. Boniface I, Letter Manet beatum, to Rufus and bishops throughout Macedonia, March 11, 422)

  • The Pope may never feel free from the cares of the Chair of Peter

The watchful care over the universal Church confided to Peter abides with him by reason of the Lord’s statement; for he knows on the testimony of the Gospel (Mt 16:18) that the Church was founded on him. His office can never be free from cares, since it is certain that all things depend on his deliberation. These considerations turn my mind to the regions of the Orient, which we behold in a way with genuine solicitude. Far be it from the priests of the Lord, that anyone of them fall into the offense of making the decrees of our elders foreign to him, by attempting something in the way of a novel and unlawful usurpation, realizing that he thus makes him a rival, in whom our Christ has placed the highest power of the priesthood, and whoever rises to reproach him cannot be an inhabitant of the heavenly regions. ‘To you,’ He said, ‘I shall give the keys of the kingdom of heaven’ (Mt 16:19) into which no one shall enter without the favor of the door-keeper. He said: ‘Thou art Peter, and upon this rock I shall build my church’ (Mt 11:29). Whoever, therefore, desires before God to be judged worthy of the dignity of the priesthood, […] should be ‘meek and humble of heart’ (Mt 11:29). lest as a contumacious disciple of him, whose pride he has imitated, he undergo the punishment of the teachers. […] No one has ever boldly raised his hands in opposition to the apostolic supremacy, from whose judgment there may be no withdrawal; no one in this has been rebellious, except him who wished judgment to be passed on himself. (Denzinger-Hünermann 234. Boniface I, Letter Manes beatum, to Rufus and bishops throughout Macedonia, March 11, 422)

…judges Francis’ idea on the Pope

  • No one dared to establish anyone above Peter

The institution of the nascent universal Church took origin from the office of Blessed Peter, in which consists its direction and apex. In effect, from this source flowed, in accordance with the development of religion, the ecclesiastic discipline in all of the Churches. The definitions of the Council of Nicaea do not testify anything else; in effect, it did not dare to establish anyone above him, since it acknowledged that no one may be put above his rank, and lastly it understood that all had been granted to him by the Lord’s word. It is certain that this Roman Church is for all of the other churches, spread around the world, just as a head is for the members. (Denzinger-Hünermann 233, Epistle Insitutio to the Bishops of Thessaly, March 11, 422)

  •  The government of the Church does not leave the Pope free from cares

The watchful care over the universal Church confided to Peter abides with him by reason of the Lord’s statement; for he knows on the testimony of the Gospel (Mt 16:18) that the Church was founded on him. His office can never be free from cares, since it is certain that all things depend on his deliberation. (Denzinger-Hünermann 234 – St. Boniface I, Epistle Manet Beatum to Rufus and the other Bishops throughout Macedonia, March 11, 422)

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