160 – We implore his help for the protection of creation as well as his pardon for the sins committed against the world in which we live

In the Epistle to the Romans, Saint Paul speaks clearly to them and to all posterity concerning the relation existing between Creation – the work of God’s hands, and eternal morality. The Apostle preached that God manifests his wrath in face of the impiety and wickedness of men, who should have come to know Him through Creation, and glorified Him for his work. For ‘although they knew God they did not accord him glory as God or give him thanks. Instead, they became vain in their reasoning, and their senseless minds were darkened. While claiming to be wise, they became fools and exchanged the glory of the immortal God for the likeness of an image of mortal man or of birds or of four-legged animals or of snakes’ (Rom 1, 21).
Something very similar happens in our day, when humanity strays from truth and morals through vain reasoning. With the resulting loss of the Christian concept of Creation, it is increasingly held that the current crisis is not caused by humanity’s estrangement from God, but rather, its neglect of nature. The solution would then lie in ‘ecological conversion,’ and not a conversion unto holiness.
Based on Saint Paul’s words, we wish to clearly establish what kind of conversion humanity needs today, and identify the real problems behind the current ecological crisis. The essential aspects of a virtuous existence as God planned it must also be established. Is caring for creation really the primordial objective of Christian life?

 

Francis

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Teachings of the Magisterium

Enter in the various parts of our study

ContentsAuthors
I – Does man need an ecological conversion or a moral one? What are the true world problems behind the current ecological crises?
II – What are the essential aspects of a virtuous existence? Is care for creation a primordial objective of Christian life?
III – What do Scripture and the Church teach about sin? Does sin offend God or the world? Does God pardon ‘sins’ committed against the world without regard for the sins against Himself?


I – Does man need an ecological conversion or a moral one? What are the true world problems behind the current ecological crisis?


Sacred Scripture

They exchanged the truth of God for a lie and revered and worshiped the creature rather than the creator

John Paul II

The true nature of the evil which faces us is a question of moral evil
The lack of a disinterested attitude enabling man to see, in visible things, the message of the invisible God who created them
Humanity is heedless of the Creator’s will that man should communicate with nature as an intelligent and noble ‘master’ and ‘guardian’
People are worried about preserving the natural habitats of animals but little effort is made to safeguard the moral conditions for an authentic ‘human ecology’
The solution to the problem of the ecological threat is in intimate relation with the truth regarding Creation and the Creator

Catechism of the Catholic Church

Use of the resources of the universe cannot be divorced from respect for moral imperatives

John XXIII

Moral goodness and the cultivation of religious values must keep pace with scientific knowledge and continually advancing technical progress
Man is not just a material organism, and purely material solutions do not have the greatest validity for problems relating to his life
The world’s Creator has stamped man’s inmost being with order; disorder comes when men disobey the ‘law written in their hearts’

Pius XII

The Christian’s action is carried out in the full observance of the moral law, which touches, through its effects, on the harmony of the world

Benedict XVI

What about the contamination of our thinking, the pollution of our souls?
Is it not true that an irresponsible use of Creation begins precisely where God is marginalized or even denied?
Human beings should interpret and shape the natural environment in accordance with the dictates of the moral law
The re-edification of the earth can only be achieved by rediscovering God
When man turns his back on the Creator’s plan he provokes disorder

Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church

If the relationship with God is placed aside, nature is stripped of its profound meaning and impoverished

II – What are the essential aspects of a virtuous existence? Is care for creation a primordial objective of Christian life?


Paul VI

The rational creature should direct his life to God the highest good

Pius XI

The Author of nature, established purposes for each kind of action; moral law subordinates such immediate purposes to our supreme and last end
What are natural disasters compared with the loss of souls?

Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church

The human person transcends the limits of the created universe: his ultimate end is God

Leo XIII

The proper valuing of the things of earth: God has given us this world as a place of exile, and not as our abiding place
Life on earth is not the final purpose for which man is created, it is only the way to that attainment of truth in which the full life of the soul consists

Saint Thomas Aquinas

For a just man to be made from a sinner is greater than to create heaven and earth
The good of grace in one is greater than the good of nature

Saint John Chrysostom

Man is more precious in the eyes of God than the entire creation

III – What do Scripture and the Church teach about sin? Does sin offend God or the world? Does God pardon ‘sins’ committed against the world without regard for the sins against Himself?


John Paul II

An essential characteristic of sin is that of being an offense toward God
Sin corrodes the relationship with God, violating his law, refusing his plan in history and overturning his set of values
Disobedience to God destroys the bond that unites man with his life principle
Sin is aversio a Deo…
and conversio ad creaturam
Every sin entails an unhealthy attachment to creatures
Mortal sin is a rejection of God’s love for humanity and the whole of creation

Saint Thomas Aquinas

Sin comprises turning away from the immutable good, which is infinite

Saint Basil the Great

Sin is a deviated use of the faculties that God has given us to practice good

Catechism of the Catholic Church

Sin is thus love of oneself even to contempt of God
Sin sets itself against God’s love for us

Catechism of Trent

By sin we become guilty before God and incur a debt of punishment
By sinning we disturb the order of God’s wisdom
Our faults violate the sanctity of the soul, and the temple of the Lord is profaned

Discover another innovation:

francis-rojoDo the faithful attain reconciliation within the Church, or elsewhere?