80 – It seems as if they rebel against God. Asking God ‘why?’ is also a prayer

Why does suffering exist? What have I done to deserve suffering? These are some of the questions that people ask themselves ever since the world began. But one can never find the right answer entirely without placing Christ in the center, because only Jesus taught this truth with the example of his own life.

However, if it is true that Christ was the example of suffering, can it be said that He, at any moment, rebelled against the Father? In the desolation felt by the soul in the ‘dark night’ of life, is it licit to blaspheme against God? Or rebel? Or become impatient? Let’s see what the Church has always taught her children…

Francis

papafrancisco

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Teachings of the Magisterium

Enter in the various parts of our study

ContentsAuthors
I – Jesus preached and practiced total obedience. His submission to the Father is witness to the fact that He did not rebel against Him on the Cross
II – The true meaning of Jesus’ cry: ‘My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?
III – What kind of prayer is pleasing to God?


I – Jesus preached and practiced total obedience. His submission to the Father is witness to the fact that He did not rebel against Him on the Cross


Sacred Scripture

‘If it is not possible that this cup pass without my drinking it, your will be done’
He was in such agony and he prayed more fervently
‘My food is to do the will of the one who sent me’
Jesus came to this world to obey
‘I do not seek my own will but the will of the one who sent me’
What Jesus said, and the way he said it, is as the Father willed
There is no wrong in Him
In the Our Father, Jesus taught us to pray: ‘Your will be done, on earth as in heaven’
To listen to the words of the Lord, and act on them, is to build on rock
Obedience makes us Jesus’ brothers and sisters
God only listens to those who do His will

II – The true meaning of Jesus’ cry: ‘My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?’


Sacred Scripture

‘He has not hid his face from him, but has heard, when he cried to him’ – the cry of the just who is persecuted and confides in God

Saint John Chrysostom

He honors the Father, and is not against Him

Saint Hilary of Poitiers

His complaint that He is left to death: He is Man. His promise of Paradise as He is dying: He is God

Origen

You must not imagine that the Savior said this after the manner of men; He said it that the people who were honored by the Father may receive the things they deserved

Benedict XVI

Jesus identifies himself with the suffering of the just of every age

Catechism of the Catholic Church

Jesus assumed us in the state of our waywardness of sin, to the point that He could say in our name: ‘My God, my God, why have you forsaken me’

John Paul II

Even when the darkness is deepest, faith points to trusting and adoring acknowledgment
Suffering and trust in the anguished ‘why’ addressed to the Father – the opening words of Psalm 22 that ends in triumph
Jesus’ cry on the Cross is not a sign of loss of hope, but of loving offering

Benedict XVI

Christ’s passion is our consolation

III – What kind of prayer is pleasing to God?


Benedict XVI

Prayer requires faith in God’s goodness
We must ask what is worthy of God

Catechism of Trent

By prayer we acknowledge and proclaim God to be the author of all good

Catechism of the Catholic Church

If we do not want to act habitually according to the Spirit of Christ, neither can we pray habitually in his name

Congregation of the Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments

Prayer should be humble and in conformity with God’s nature

John Paul II

Prayer is in fact the recognition of our limitation and our dependence

Benedict XVI

Prayer does not exempt us from suffering, but permits us to face it with the confidence of Jesus

NEW!!!: Recently, during his flight from the United States to Rome, Francis took the initiative to exemplify this doctrine that condones rebellion against God:

Recounting the – real or supposed – case of a person faced with the tragic and dramatic situation of a child suffering abuse, Francis had nothing better to say than to declare that a total lack of conformity to God’s permission of evil that goes even to the point of revolt, blasphemy, loss of faith and negation of God taken to the final moment of life is ‘understandable’: “I understand that woman. I understand her. And God, who is much better than me, he understands. I am sure that God has received that woman”.

Obviously, confiding such a person to God’s infinite mercy is part of basic Catholic common-sense. But, a public guarantee of eternal salvation? By the one who occupies the chair of the Supreme Teacher of the peoples?
 


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A picture is worth a thousand words….and a gesture, sometimes, more than an official document…